Author Archive

Competitive intelligence on a ICU/CCU product’s new feature


This study shows an example of MedSpan’s competitive intelligence studies for medical device manufacturers. Based off our results, we were able to provide our client with insight as to what users like about our client’s competitor’s device and what other features users would like the device to contain.

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Continue Reading November 14, 2012 at 4:56 PM 1 comment

Differentiating a Core Hospital-based Therapy


In this case study we examine which product characteristics are most influential towards brand selection for our client’s product and which enhancements could drive brand preference towards their product.

Continue Reading September 24, 2012 at 2:43 PM 1 comment

Pricing Study for a Novel Medical Device


In this study, we were able to provide valuable insights to a start-up medical device manufacturer to help them decide what price premium to charge for their first product.

Continue Reading August 23, 2012 at 10:43 AM Leave a comment

Woes of a Disjointed Healthcare System


As we all know, the cost of healthcare in the United States is high and growing.  Expenditures surpassed $2.3 trillion in 2008, more than three times the $714 billion spent in 1990, and over eight times the $253 billion spent in 1980. Stemming this growth has become a major policy priority, as the government, employers, and consumers increasingly struggle to keep up with health care costs. (Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Office of the Actuary, National Health Statistics Group, National Health Care Expenditures Data, January 2010.)

The healthcare industry, patient advocates and governmental bodies are pursuing many solutions.  These include, but are not limited to:

  • Investment in information technology
  • Improving quality and efficiency (e.g., encouraging evidence-based medicine, reducing unnecessary variations in care) – Some experts estimate that up to 30% of health care is unnecessary, emphasizing the need to streamline the health care system and eliminate this needless spending.
  • Adjusting provider compensation (e.g., sharing cost savings)
  • Government regulation (e.g., recent Medicare initiatives to control costs)
  • Encouraging prevention
  • Increasing consumer involvement in purchasing
  • Altering the tax preference for employer-sponsored insurance

One of the strengths of our current healthcare system, as well as one of its weaknesses, is that it is a market-based system.  We have multiple providers competing against each other.  The strength is that competition leads to innovation if not the low cost we might expect.  However, a market-based, competitive system also leads to a system that can make it difficult for providers to work together.  The resulting lack of coordination can have a negative impact on patient care and lost opportunities for reducing costs.

For example, MedSpan has a client that provides patient care in all 50 states.  They considered developing a unique program that could extend the reach of physicians’ care between visits, enhance patient-physician relationships, encourage therapy compliance and afford the opportunity for earlier identification of disease progression.  However, one of the challenges the program faces is that without coverage of the program by all health plans in a geographic region, physicians do not easily know which patients they can refer to the program.

Assume that only a few health plans provided coverage for our client’s program.  A physician would need to 1) determine that a patient would benefit from the program, 2) determine if the patient’s health plan provides coverage for the program and 3) refer the patient to the provider (my client), 4) develop a relationship with the provider and 5) exchange information to monitor progress, thereby ensuring a benefit for the patient and physician.

That’s a lot of work for physicians who, typically, do not have the time available.  This is especially true if only 5 or 10 patients might benefit from the program and only a few might have coverage.  As a result, a potentially beneficial program falls through the cracks due to a disjointed healthcare system.

A system integrated through better information systems would address some of the challenges the above program faces, but not all.  An extreme solution would be a single-payer system.  While facilitating coordination of care, a single payer system would engender a host of other issues.  For example, the innovation that competition generates may diminish.  Therefore, the question to address is how close should we move to a single payer system while maintaining the competitive, free market that is the foundation of the American economy?

That’s an issue we’ll address in a future entry into our blog.

November 14, 2011 at 8:27 AM Leave a comment

What are Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs)?


Hello again!

Since our last blog post, the leaves have turned green, the summer months have passed, and we have just begun to enjoy the crisp autumn air.

Lately there has been much debate surrounding the launch of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under President Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. ACOs are one of the key provisions in the 2010 health reform law designed to help reduce the cost of medical care. There is so much talk about this concept, but what exactly are ACOs?

An ACO is a network of providers and hospitals that share responsibility for delivering healthcare to a minimum of 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries for at least three years. It is based on the idea that hospitals, doctors, and other health care providers should work together to coordinate care for their patients. By coordinating care, the ACO will reduce costs by avoiding unnecessary tests and procedures. Those organizations that produce better outcomes will be rewarded, and for those that don’t, financial penalties will be incurred. In a recent study of ours, we found that with the development of ACOs, providers will take on responsibility for not only delivering actual medical care, but also providing some level of medical management between appointments.

Sounds like a great idea however, a lot skepticism has surrounded the development and launching of ACOs. First, there are very few providers that truly understand the ACO concept. In a recent survey conducted by Beacon Partners, only 15% of 200 provider organizations are “very familiar” with ACOs. Of those 200 surveyed, 92% are in the development stages for an ACO, and nearly all respondents’ budgets are not yet established.

Second, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) have yet to issue the final rules, which will affect the application process that prospective participants have to go through. Prospective participants will need to review the final rules before entering the application process in order to demonstrate their ability to comply with the eligibility requirements. Then, CMS will need to review all applications and offer contracts before the January 2012 launch deadline.

Lastly, the systems that were considered to be the models for a new health care delivery system, namely the Mayo Clinic, the Cleveland Clinic, Geisinger Health System and Intermountain Healthcare, have all declined to apply for the ACO program. Hospital and physician groups complained that the program created more financial risks than rewards and imposed burdensome reporting requirements.

Given the series of events surrounding the development of ACOs, it is no wonder that there is skepticism and doubt. Too much confusion and too many barriers surround the development of ACOs, including high start-up costs and regulatory issues. Add to that the refusal by health system role models to apply to the ACO program and you have a complicated situation.

Referring to our last post, this is one way to reduce the cost of care, a much needed move in our unstable economy. As prices for healthcare keep increasing over the year (health insurance is expected to rise 5.4% in 2012), patients deserve access to affordable healthcare. We urge ACO development leaders to address the barriers that health systems are encountering in order to aid in launching a successful ACO program.

Author:  Nicole Victoria

Editors:  Ken Chiang and Robert Kaminksy

 

October 26, 2011 at 3:52 PM Leave a comment


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