Market research — A competitive differentiator


Market research data are typically used to inform product design, marketing strategies and tactics. Sometimes, the data are the end goal. The data can be used to develop a competitive differentiation and deliver value to customers.

Continue Reading November 11, 2015 at 6:27 PM 1 comment

Reference Pricing — Coming soon to a health plan near you?


There is great interest in reference pricing in the US for select medical procedures and branded drugs. While only 10% of mid-sized and large employers are utilizing reference pricing, more than 2/3 of employers have an interest in this payment technique. If it takes hold, there is a potential impact on utilization, revenue and quality of care that manufacturers will need to address.

Continue Reading November 11, 2015 at 6:00 PM Leave a comment

Payer 101: One size doesn’t fit all: Sample sizes for payer research


At MedSpan Research, we have over 17 years of payer research experience. In our Payer 101 series, we’re sharing our expertise with you. In our two previous posts in this series, we covered the basics of the U.S. payer landscape as well as the appropriate titles within these organizations to include in payer research projects. In this final post in the series, we’ll discuss how to determine the appropriate number of payers to include in your research study.

Continue Reading November 5, 2015 at 6:03 PM Leave a comment

High-Deductible Health Plans


At MedSpan Research, one of our key areas of focus is payer issues. Throughout my daily work, I hear about various trends within the healthcare industry. One trend that I continually come across, and have encountered personally, is the increase in the prevalence of high-deductible health insurance plans, including consumer-driven health plans. So, what is a high-deductible health plan?

Continue Reading November 1, 2015 at 10:48 PM Leave a comment

MedSpan Musings — Tips for better market research


MedSpan MusingWhen conducting market research with the hospital pharmacy department, ensure that the right section is informing your actions.

While some hospital pharmacies limit their scope of practice to their individual hospital, others are responsible for the purchasing and management of drug therapies throughout the integrated delivery system.

  • Pharmacy directors — Sets policy for operations, contracting, inventory management, and intra-delivery system distribution. The pharmacy director typical is a voting member of the P&T Committee, thereby influencing product selection.The pharmacy director tends to be the most knowledgeable among his or her staff regarding billing, coding and reimbursement for drug therapy. However, in our experience, the level of expertise in these areas varies between hospital pharmacy directors.

    Integrated delivery systems may have one pharmacy director for inpatient care and another for outpatient care. They report to a Vice President of Pharmacy. Standalone hospitals tend to have one pharmacy director.

  • Clinical pharmacists — Are often stationed throughout the hospital. Share drug insights with other clinicians. Develop drug monographs for the P&T Committee. Each clinical pharmacist specializes in one or more disease categories (e.g., cardiovascular disease) or hospital patient care unit (e.g., emergency medicine).
  • IV operations managers — Oversees compounding processes and clean rooms. IV operations managers are important respondents for studies involving IV therapies.
  • Pharmacy buyers — Work directly with wholesalers and drug companies to execute the delivery system’s day-to-day buying practices.

October 26, 2015 at 3:44 PM Leave a comment

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