Posts filed under ‘Nursing Home Care’

A Different Type of Elderly Living Facility -The Movement Away from Traditional Nursing Homes


A new type of geriatric living facility is catching on. “Project Green Homes” are an alternative way of approaching elderly care. With more community-based living and less regimented schedules, residents are seeing improvements in their health and happiness.

Continue Reading April 21, 2015 at 1:14 PM Leave a comment

Many Medicare Beneficiaries Seeing Their Needs Unmet, Especially When Care Being Prepaid


One of the most vulnerable patient groups in healthcare are the elderly. Still, there are Medicare beneficiaries reporting needs that are unmet. This includes any care that a patient requires, but does not receive.

Continue Reading April 6, 2015 at 11:32 AM Leave a comment

The Rising Cost for Elderly Living in Private Rooms in Nursing Homes


$87,600 was the national median rate for a year’s nursing home stay per resident in a private room in 2014. This has been a 4.3% increase from 2013 showing rising post-acute care costs.

Continue Reading April 2, 2015 at 4:04 PM Leave a comment

The Adult Disposable Brief Market — Opportunities for differentiation


This brief study indicates that there are opportunities to improve the designs of adult disposable briefs to differentiate each brand from its competition. Such differentiation could encourage nursing homes to switch their preferred brand of adult disposable briefs even though brand loyalty is high.

Continue Reading May 1, 2013 at 5:48 PM 2 comments

Niche marketing — Finding that special population


As this case study illustrates, niche marketing can deliver incremental revenue.

Continue Reading March 28, 2013 at 10:30 AM Leave a comment

Case Study: Crossing the Hospital-Alternate Site Continuum


This study demonstrates how one of our clients was able gain information on how to improve their marketing strategy for a product in order to retain customers as they moved from the hospital to an alternate site of care.

Continue Reading October 30, 2012 at 10:03 AM 1 comment

EMR vs. EHR


Do you know the difference between an “electronic medical record” (EMR) and an “electronic health record” (EHR)? There is a common misconception that these terms are interchangeable, and many people today could not tell you if there is a difference between the two terms, let alone what that difference is.

An EMR is essentially the equivalent of a paper chart for a patient that is filled out by providers within an individual healthcare delivery organization (e.g. hospitals, physician’s offices), and is a legal record owned by that organization. EMR computer software is sold by enterprise vendors to hospitals, clinics, and other care delivery sites.

An EHR is a subset of EMRs that contains patient information from different healthcare delivery organizations. These records are owned by the patient or stakeholder, and the information can be shared through an EHR network. Unlike EMRs, electronic health records are interactive and the patient can access and supplement the information contained in the file. EHRs connect different healthcare organizations and may contain more detailed information about a patient’s demographics, medications, medical history, etc.

So, in order to utilize EHRs and for them to be effective, EMR software must be adopted by healthcare delivery organizations. Based on an HIMSS Analytics report published in 2006, the majority of hospitals have begun to implement EMRs, but at that point were not beyond the earliest stages. Since then both EMR systems and EHRs have grown in utilization and popularity, considering the potential for the easy sharing of patient information between healthcare organizations. A 2011 presentation by HIMSS shows that in 2011 more hospitals are developing their ability to use EHRs.

Both EMRs and EHRs are clearly an area of high potential for the healthcare industry. As the systems are more widely adopted and developed further at various organizations, the added ease of access and quality of health information will ideally help care provider organizations provide better treatment for patients. There are potential worries related to privacy and security with this type of information being transmitted electronically, however that is an entirely different issue that I will leave to be discussed at another time.

 

Author: Jamie Notaro

Edited by: Ken Chiang

 

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Other resources:

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March 21, 2012 at 11:02 AM Leave a comment

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